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1 November - Programme

ASCI Conference More information ASCI Conference Room
IPA Fall Days More information  IPA Conference Room
     

2 November - Programme SIREN//NL

     
09.30 - 10.00 Welcome with coffee and tea Zeeland Foyer
     
10.00 - 11.15 Opening  - Arnold Smeulders (Chair IPN)
Keynote lecture

Rethinking Software Dependability
Daniel Jackson (MIT)
Brabant Conference Room
 
11.15 - 11.30  Coffee and tea break Zeeland Foyer
     
  ASCI Conference Room
Chair - Thilo Kielmann (VU)

IPA Conference Room

Chair - Doaitse Swierstra (UU)

SIKS Conference Room

Chair - Hans Akkermans (VU)

SIREN//NL Conference Room

Chair - IPN/NWO/STW

11.30 - 12.00 Wireless Sensor Networks,
Hype or Reality?

Koen Langendoen (TUD)
A geometry-sensitive analysis of geometric algorithms
Mark de Berg (TUE)
11.30 - 12.15
Informatics and Scientific Method
Hans Akkermans (VU)
Introduction into Patents

Peter van Dongen

NL Patent Office
12.00 - 12.30
Welcome to the jungle
Frank Seinstra (VU)
Determining Quality of Model Transformations
Mark van den Brand (TUE)
12.15 - 13.00
Multi-Agent Systems:
The Path from Theory to pratice

John-Jules Meyer (UU/Turing Institute Almere)

How to write an ICT proposal 
by NWO & STW

 

12.30 - 13.00 Adaptive streaming applications
and multi-core architectures
Gerard Smit (UT)
Executable Models of Biological Systems
Wan Fokkink (VU)
  How to write an ICT proposal
by NWO & STW
     
13.00 - 14.30 Lunch & Poster session Restaurant Uithof
     
  ASCI Conference Room

Chair - Marc van Kreveld (UU)

IPA Conference Room
Chair - Jos Baeten (TUE)

SIKS Conference Room

Chair - Hans Akkermans (VU)

SIREN//NL Conference Room

Chair - IPN/NWO/STW

14.30 - 15.00 Advances in Cellular and Molecular Bioimaging
Erik Meijering (Erasmus MC)
High-performance Model checking for everybody
Jaco van de Pol (UT)
14.30 - 15.15
Generating Texts from Memory
Antal van den Bosch (UvT)

Patentabilty in ICT Inventions
Peter van Dongen

NL Patent Office

15.00 - 15.30

Geometry for Robotics and Industrial Automation 

Frank van der Stappen (UU)

Intelligent data management of a sensor network mounted on the "Hollandse Brug" 

Joost Kok (UL)

15.15 - 16.00
Big data and SIKS research:
let's quickly try this on 25 terabytes
- Djoerd Hiemstra (UT)
How to write an ICT proposal 
by NWO & STW
15.30 - 16.00 Multi-valued images in medical
imaging: the applications, the mathematics
and the visualization
Bart ter Haar Romeny (TUE)

Coalgebraic Walks, in Quantum and Turing Computation

Bart Jacobs (RU)
  How to write an ICT proposal 
by NWO & STW
     
16.00 - 16.30 Afternoon break Restaurant Uithof For SIKS members:
Annual SIKS meeting/ Afternoon break 
in SIKS Conference Room
 
     
16.35 - 18.00

Best Poster Award
Keynote lecture: "Where Are W
e Going"

Andy Tanenbaum

Brabant Conference Room
     
Approx. 18.00                Drinks Restaurant Uithof
     
Approx. 18.30 -21.30               Dinner Restaurant Uithof
     

3 November - Programme

ASCI Conference More information  ASCI Conference Room
IPA Fall Days  More information IPA Conference Room
 

Hans Akkermans (VU)
Informatics and Scientific Method

Computer science and, more broadly, informatics are disciplines that distinguish themselves from other disciplines not only in subject matter but also in scientific research methodology. Researchers from other disciplines -both in the natural and the social sciences - often have a hard time to understand the scientific nature of CS/Informatics.
CS/Informatics itself has traditionally taken a relatively liberal but also eclectic perspective on scientific method. The growing maturity of the field as well as the great societal success of ICT technologies (which introduces many new interdisciplinary issues) now require that we as a field explicitly reflect on our experiences and contribute to the renewal of scientific method. I discuss several multi-disciplinary perspectives on scientific method and offer some suggestions as to what makes CS/Informatics methodologically special and innovative.

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Mark de Berg (TUE)
A geometry-sensitive analysis of geometric algorithms
Algorithms for spatial data play a central role in GIS, robotics, graphics, and many other areas within computer science. Traditionally, the performance of geometric algorithms is analyzed as a function of the number of input objects. In this talk we survey the research where the shape and distribution of the objects is taken into account as well, leading to a more accurate and realistic analysis.

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Antal van den Bosch (TU)
Generating Texts from Memory
Some of the hottest application areas in present-day natural language processing require a natural language generation component able to generate text that is at least well-formed and fluent (syntactically) and meaningful (semantically), and possibly also appropriate in the context it is generated (pragmatically). Think of the translation in machine translation, the paraprase in automatic paraphrasing, and the summary in automated summarization. Essentially, these are text-to-text tasks where the input and output stand in a (partially) mutual entailment relation. One of the surprising insights of the last decade is that mutual entailment can be established through analogy by similarity. If X is a translation of A, and B is similar to A, then the translation of B will be equally similar to X. It turns out that similarity can be estimated quite powerfully by measuring the overlap in words and sequences of words. By showing up in each other's context, words encode meaning, and analogy-based reasoning through similarity is able to capture this hidden meaning layer quite well. This is why Google Translate is able to translate (reasonably) between 52 languages without using any explicit linguistic knowledge about any of these languages. I provide an under-the-hood analysis of memory-based, analogy-based reasoning systems developed at Tilburg University that can translate and paraphrase.

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Peter van Dongen (NL Patent Office)
Morning session: An introduction into patents
This introduction will elaborate why patents exist, how patent granting procedures work and how patents can be used in the process of valorisation of scientific research. An attempt will be made to clarify the essential difference between a discovery and an invention and subsequently what are the criteria to be met in order that inventions can be patented.

Afternoon session: The patentability of ICT inventions
Inventions can be patented on the condition that a number of criteria will be met. However national patent legislation and international patent conventions and treaties impose extra criteria for the patentability of ICT inventions. A case study of a so called Computer Implemented Invention ( CII ) will be elaborated.

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Wan Fokkink (VU)
Executable Models of Biological Systems
Wan Kokking will discuss how Petri nets are being used to mimick the behavior of biological cells. Simulation results with these Petri nets are in agreement with experiments performed on living cells. Moreover, new predictions have been made that await confirmation from the wet lab.

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Daniel Jackson (MIT)
Conventional methods for achieving software quality -such as lifecycle processes and testing -don't ensure that the resulting software can be depended on in critical applications. And formal verification seems to be infeasible for large-scale systems. So what can be done? A new approach is taking hold in which an explicit dependability case is constructed; this has fundamental implications for requirements and software design, and suggests a new role for formal methods. I'll explain these ideas, and tell you about how we're pursuing them in projects in my own research group.

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Bart ter Haar Romeny (TUE)
Multi-valued images in medical imaging: the applications, the mathematics, and the visualizations
In medical imaging more and more multi-valued images appear (measured and calculated): flow vectors from MRI tagging, (high angular resolution) diffusion tensor imaging, strain tensors of deforming tissue, etc. Extra dimensions appear in multi-scale and multi-orientation applications. How to convey this complexity towards clinically useful applications? We discuss the state-of-the-art.

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Djoerd Hiemstra (UT)
Big data and SIKS research: let's quickly try this on 25 terabytes
The term "big data" is increasingly used to denote data sets that are too large to be handled by traditional database management tools. I will discuss technologies pioneered by Google that handle very big data sets on clusters of machines, such as the Google File System, MapReduce, and Bigtable. Open source implementations of these technologies, as for instance provided by the Apache Hadoop project, open up the feasibility to do large-scale experimental work on very big data sets with little effort. Researchers that are able to adapt their prototypes to use big data solutions, will be able to show more impressive and more realistic results, than their colleagues that miss out on these developments. I will give examples of successful research by groups in SIKS that leverage big data solutions to quickly and easily test software prototypes on web-scale datasets.

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Bart Jacobs (RU)
Coalgebraic Walks, in Quantum and Turing Computation
Non-deterministic, probabilistic and quantum walks will be described, from the perspective of coalgebras and monads. Non-deterministic and probabilistic walks are coalgebras of a monad (powerset and distribution), in an obvious manner. It will be shown that also quantum walks are coalgebras of a new monad, involving additional control structure. This new monad will also be used to describe Turing machines coalgebraically, namely as controlled `walks' on a tape.

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Koen Langendoen (TUD)
Wireless Sensor Networks, Hype or Reality?
In the late 90's the Smart Dust project envisioned a new class of computing where tiny, cheap sensor nodes would connect wirelessly, and collaborate at observing physical phenomena at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Many researchers embraced the concept and started working on realizing that vision. Now, more than a decade later, it is time to draw the balance and see if the field of Wireless Sensor Networks lived up to its promises.

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Erik Meijering (Erasmus MC)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Bioimaging
The past decade has seen an unprecedented image data explosion in biology. To ensure objectivity, efficiency, and completeness in the analysis of these data, computational tools are indispensable. An overview is given of recent efforts to develop improved methods for microscopic imaging and image data analysis.

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John-Jules Meyer (UU/Turing Institute Almere)
Multi-Agent Systems: The Path from Theory to Practice
I've been involved in agent research for almost two decades now. In this talk I'll discuss the interests I've had in the various aspects of this research. We started this research from the perspective of logic(ians). Although I still like a nice theoretical / logical framework, I have become increasingly interested in applications. Especially the issue of knowledge valorization in this area is really interesting but does not come for free. I'll talk about some of the things we do in my groups in Utrecht (also partly in cooperation with TNO Human Factors) and in Almere.

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Jaco van de Pol (UT)
High-performance Model Checking for Everybody
Model Checking is a successful technique for checking temporal properties of dynamic systems, like software, hardware, or even biological systems. Being an exhaustive technique, model checkers need complicated algorithms that are normally tightly coupled to particular specification languages. We will show how LTSMIN provides language-independent access to high-performance model checking.

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Frank Seinstra (VU)
Welcome to the jungle
Recent years have shown a growing need for executing scientific applications on a diversity of distributed and hierarchical computing platforms (e.g. clusters, grids, clouds) simultaneously. A true 'computing jungle'. This presentation explores the use of such 'Jungle Computing Systems' in every-day scientific practice, and briefly introduces the upcoming DAS-4 system.

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Gerard Smit (UT)
Adaptive streaming applications and multi-core architectures
Adaptive streaming applications form a good match with multi-core architectures. When processing and memory is combined in the cores tasks can be executed efficiently. Examples of streaming applications are: wireless baseband processing (for WiMax, DAB, DRM, and DVB), multimedia processing (e.g. MPEG, MP3 coding/decoding), medical image processing and color image processing.

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Frank van der Stappen (UU)
Geometry for Robotics and Industrial Automation
Algorithmic Automation is the field that is concerned with the algorithmic design of systems for tasks in industrial automation. We review the main results in the field and discuss a few challenging open problems.

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Uitgelicht

Evenementen ICT

ICT.OPEN 2012

Stelling

Roadmap ICT

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Uitgelicht

Evenementen ICT

ICT.OPEN 2012

Stelling

Roadmap ICT

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